What is Cystic Fibrosis?

Cystic Fibrosis, one of the rare diseases, has approximately 100,000 patients worldwide. Respiratory problems are the most serious issue associated with CF and there is currently no cure.*

​Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive, genetic disease that cause persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time.

In the lungs, the mucus clogs the airways and traps bacteria leading to infections, extensive lung damage, 

and eventually, respiratory failure.*

What is NOT Cystic Fibrosis?

CF is Not Contagious

 

Because CF causes coughing, some people think you can “catch” it. CF is genetic. You are born with it.

CF Does Not Affect the Brain

 

Some people confuse CF with cerebral palsy. CF does not affect the brain, nervous system or the capacity to learn.

CF Has No Cure at This Time

 

But with treatment, most people with CF grow up and lead active, full lives.

CF Is Not Caused by Anything The Parents Did Before or During Pregnancy

 

Parents feel responsible for what happens to their children. Nothing parents did before caused CF.

Cystic Fibrosis

Managing

Each day, people with CF complete a combination of the following therapies:

  • Manual Chest Physiotherapy or HFCWO vests to help loosen and get rid of the thick mucus that can build up in the lungs.

  • Inhaled medicines include antibiotics to fight lung infections and therapies to help keep the airways clear.

  • Pancreatic enzyme supplement capsules to improve the absorption of vital nutrients.

  • An individualized fitness plan to help improve energy, lung function, and overall health

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'' Cystic Fibrosis patients have annual healthcare expenditures of $48,098. It is 22 times higher than for a cohort without CF.* ''

References

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Trust. “Faqs”. Retrieved from https://www.cysticfibrosis.org.uk/what-is-cystic-fibrosis/faqs

  2. UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland. “Cystic Fibrosis”. Retrieved from https://www.childrenshospitaloakland.org/main/about-cystic-fibrosis.aspx

  3. Ouyang L, et al. Healthcare expenditures for privately insured people with cystic fibrosis. Pediatr Pulmonol 2009; 44: 989-996.​